Logan (2017) Implied Readership- Who was it for?

Logan (2017)

Director: James Mangold; Screenplay: Scott Frank, James Mangold  & Michael Green.

James Mangold’s adaptation of Logan (2017) from the Marvel comic was heavily anticipated even before the trailer was released, knowing it was the end of a well loved character. For those who had seen the previous X-Men films there was a clear level of expectation from this, and for those who had read the comics, knew the story could have gone in a multitude of directions. It is this question of how will it happen that brings about talk and expands the fandom to those who like action.

From the onset of of the use of ‘Hurt’  as the soundtrack in the trailer and the reveal of new character Laura, someone who was ‘very much’ like Logan, the expectations of what this film would be grew. The scene where Logan takes Laura’s hand is somehow desired throughout the movie, as a symbol of their love and relationship of parent and child.  It’s also a sign that Logan has faced his fear.

But this is by far the only audience that Mangold had in mind, especially when a black and white version was released. This was not just for the fan’s of the genre but of cinematography.

“One Batch Two Batch…”

Daredevil Season 2 Episode 4 Penny and Dime  –

Dir: Peter Hoar; Written By: John C. Kelly

We watch film and TV to escape, to forget and also to grow.  Through these characters we according to Cohen (2013:183), expand are own ’emotional and mental lives’ beyond that of personal experience.  We identify with both the characters and their situation, we empathise with them and understand their goals, we make a connection, become invested in their outcome and are interest is caught.

Netflix’s, Marvel’s Daredevil second antagonist, Frank Castle, is a war veteran, a US marine corps sniper, he has taken out entire gangs. We know he is dangerous.

Karen, a reporter is at Castle’s home. A regular family home with photos of his wife and kids in various stages of growing up, of castle in fatigues, a medal of Honour proudly displayed,  a book is in his daughters room, the words emblazoned on the pages, the words Castle says before he pulls the trigger “One Batch Two Batch”, his daughters favourite book.  We recognise the kids trainers on the stairs, the box of kid’s toys, we too have family photo’s on the mantlepiece.

Rescued by Daredevil, Castle tells of the murder of his family by a gang in a park. We empathise with him, this could have been any family, this has never happened to you, but your gut wrenches too, we cry.  We understand his needs and goals, we want revenge too.

The story feels real, you have felt raw emotion, mirrored the feelings on screen. He maybe on a rampage, but he has damn good reason. He maybe seen as the antagonist to the vigilante Daredevil but he isn’t evil, he isn’t your typical bad guy. And because of this you have a strong connection for him to get his revenge, to see his goal through to the end, you want it to be alright for him. You have connected, you are invested as much as Castle. You have identified with the character and his situation.

As Cohen (2013:186) points out this is an active psychological state, just one of the many ways we respond to film and TV.

 

 Cohen J. (2013). Chapter 11. Audience Identification with media characters in  Jennings, Bryant and Vorderer, Peter.(eds)  Psychology of Entertainment. London. Routledge

 

Jessica Jones Season One Opener review

jj Netflix Season Premiere One- November 20th 2015 -Dir. S.J. Clarkson

As the second series is out tomorrow on Netflix, I thought a review of the start of the show was apt.

It’s clear from the opening credits that this Marvel show is going to be more adult orientated. Dark, seedy with only a glimmer of light, it has undertones of a 1930/40’s classic with private investigator’s such as Sam Spade or Philp Marlow.  As the title states, this isn’t some rainmac wearing PI, but the truly unique Jessica Jones. A flawed character in many ways, Jones struggles to gain control over her own life and seeks solace in whiskey and her work, avoiding contact with clients and a best friend.

A commentary by Jones starting the episode using words such as ‘looking’ ‘finding’ ‘reality’, gives us an inside into her unknown, as yet past. Whatever has happened has left her jaded, judgemental and questioning every aspect. A chance encounter with a man she has been spying on, leads to a mantra being repeated.  A missing daughter and concerned parent’s,  lead back to the past Jones is running from. She may have a hard exterior and superhuman strength yet this past brings a rawness that sees Jones go weak, ready to quit, until her tough-talking friend reminds her of who she is, a survivor and a fighter. Jones goes to the rescue, but it isn’t enough.

Supported by a mainly female cast Jessica Jones, will have you empathising with her emotions, sniggering at her sarcasm, and curious as to what the hell happened to her.